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276
RAPID POFULATIC
TABLE 1
Per Annum Population Growth Rates, 1950-1960, for Major Developing World Regions
Growth Rates
Ratio
World Region
Urban/      Cit; Rural-    Tow Col. (3)/ Col. Total  Rural  Urban  Towna  Cityb    Col. (2)   Col.
	(1)	(2)	(3)	(4)	(5)	(6)	(7
Northern Africa	2.4	1.7	4.3	3.9	4.6	2.5	1.:
Western Africa	3.4	2.9	6.9	5.8	9.4	2.4	1.1
Eastern Africa	2.5	2.2	5.5	3.6	10.0	2.5	2.:
Middle and							
Southern Africa"	1.8	1.3	7.7	5.7	12.0	5.9	2.
Middle America	3.1	1.8	4.8	4.4	5.5	2.7	1.:
Caribbean	2.2	1.7	3.1	2.3	4.2	1.8	1.
Tropical South							
America	3.1	1.6	5.4	3.9	6.9	3.4	1.
East Asia	1.8	1.1	6.0	6.1	5.9	5.4	1.'
Southeast Asia	2.5	2.1	4.6	3.2	5.7	2.2	1.
Southwest Asia	2.7	1.9	4.7	3.2	6.5	2.5	2.'
South Central Asia	1.9	1.8	2.7	1.8	3.5	1.5	1.
Oceania	2.7	2.6	4.8	4.8	0	1.8	
aLess than 100,000. bMore than 100,000.
cPercent city population is of total population, estimated for 1970. Excludes Union of South Africa.
Source: Adapted from (6, Table D).
Since the large city category is a terminal one (cities may gro out of it) this means that this category inevitably comes t increasing share of the urban population. To illustrate, in Mex lation 10,000-and-over as the urban criterion, the 100,000-am rose from 27 percent of the total urban population in 1910 t 1960 (5). We may safely predict an increase in the important population, both for the urban and for the total population.
As a further restriction on the scope of this paper, compar selectivity in the developing countries with that of the develc either at the present time or at comparable periods in their de been kept to a minimum not only because of space consideris class of cities. Small and medium-size cities up to 100,000 have not received nearly the attention given the larger cities. Even among the latter there is generally an emphasis on the first city or the first two cities. In Latin America, where first-city dominance is especially pronounced, the index of entries by city in a recent bibliography on urbanization in Latin America by Vaughan (4) shows that for nearly every country the first city, or in a few cases the first two cities, account for more entries than all other cities combined.